A City Committed to Peace- An Agenda for the City of Charlottesville

* Tuesday, January 3rd, 7:00 pm I will be presenting this agenda, and a request from myself, the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice, and hundreds of Cville residents for an updated resolution devoting the city to peace (item a.). Show up early to speak in favor of a new peace resolution! Sign the Petition Here!
** completed Peace Agenda and updates posted soon!
*** learn more about why Peace is a Local Issue 

5. – A City Committed to Peace

In 2003 Charlottesville City Council passed a resolution proclaiming it a “City of Peace”. While this resolution on its own failed to keep the US government from invading and occupying Iraq at a cost of $799 billion and 4,484 US lives lost, as well as up to 1.5 million Iraqi lives lost, the resolution was part of a larger movement nationwide of local governments publicly stating their opposition to the disastrous war.

An updated resolution is needed, now more than ever, due to the financial burden placed on localities by increasing military costs, and the dominance of local economies by the military industrial complex.

Resolutions alone do not make changes in the broader society, but they do commit the body to taking a meaningful approach to peace. For this reason, I propose that the city do more than pass a resolution. That it also take steps to actively acknowledge their responsibility for maintaining the culture that imposes, even requires, warfare and to take adequate steps to resist the influence of the military industrial complex, the burden of a bloated military budget, the role of municipalities in city planning contributing to wars for resources, and the recruitment of young people and poor people to do the killing and dying in unnecessary, expensive, and illegal wars and occupations.

To this end, here is an agenda for peace, somewhat limited to what may have political support from City Council, but that a great many of our residents can support, and even mobilize to take steps to actively end Charlottesville’s participation in our increasingly militarized nation:

a. Resolution Calling for End to War and Bringing Our War Dollars Home
b. Cost of War Counter for City Hall and http://www.charlottesville.org
c. Exclude Military Contractors, Military Agencies, and Paramilitary Organizations from Charlottesville Community Job Fair
d. Committee to Convert Military Industrial Complex in Charlottesville to Civilian Use
e. Support for Advocate Committee to explore new Sister City Relationship(s)
f. Call for Arrest of War Criminals who Enter Charlottesville City Limits
g. Declare September 21st International Day of Peace, host IDoP Celebration
h. End Reliance on Oil Resources in City Planning
i. Support Community Efforts to Reduce Presence of Military in City Schools

##### 

 a. Resolution Calling for End to War and
Bringing Our War Dollars Home

Background
-In 1988 Charlottesville City Council declared the City “Nuclear Free” to add to the international calls for disarmament.
-In 2003 Charlottesville City Council passed a resolution proclaiming it a “City for Peace” in opposition to imminent invasion of Iraq.
-In 2011 Mayor Norris was the first to sign the “Mayors for Peace” statement, suggesting that an updated commitment to peace is warranted and desired by the citizens of Charlottesville.
-City councilors have expressed interest in an updated resolution on the effects of military spending on local budgets.
-Similar resolutions have recently been passed in Seattle WA, Portland OR, Hartford CT, Los Angeles CA, and San Francisco CA. These municipal resolutions are part of a widening movement to redirect military spending for domestic priorities.

Materials
Petitions reading “I believe the City of Charlottesville should follow the example of the U.S. Conference of Mayors and pass a resolution supporting efforts to speed up the ending of current U.S. wars, and calling on Congress and the President to bring the war dollars home to meet vital human needs, promote job creation, rebuild our infrastructure, aid municipal and state governments, and develop a new economy based upon renewable, sustainable energy.” have been submitted January 3, including over 200 signatures (see attachment 1.) and 117 on-line signatures at http://warisacrime.org/petition/60191

-2003 City For Peace Declaration can be found in city archives.

-2011 Mayors for Peace Declaration:
CALLING ON CONGRESS TO REDIRECT MILITARY SPENDING TO DOMESTIC PRIORITIES
WHEREAS, the severity of the ongoing economic crisis has created budget shortfalls at all levels of government and requires us to re-examine our national spending priorities; and
WHEREAS, the people of the United States are collectively paying approximately $126 billion dollars per year to wage war in Iraq and Afghanistan; and
WHEREAS, 6,024 members of the US armed forces have died in these wars; and at least 120,000 civilians have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since the coalition attacks began.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the U.S. Conference of Mayors supports efforts to speed up the ending of these wars; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the U.S. Conference of Mayors calls on the U.S. Congress to bring these war dollars home to meet vital human needs, promote job creation, rebuild our infrastructure, aid municipal and state governments, and develop a new economy based upon renewable, sustainable energy

Draft Resolution:
CALLING ON CONGRESS TO REDIRECT MILITARY SPENDING TO DOMESTIC PRIORITIES
WHEREAS, the severity of the ongoing economic crisis has created budget shortfalls at all levels of government and requires us to re-examine our national spending priorities; and
WHEREAS, every dollar spent on the military produces fewer jobs than spending the same dollar on education, healthcare, clean energy, or even tax cuts for household consumption; and
WHEREAS, U.S. military spending has approximately doubled in the past decade, in real dollars and as a percentage of federal discretionary spending;
WHEREAS, well over half of federal discretionary spending is now spent on the military;
WHEREAS, we are spending more money on the military now than during the Cold War, the Vietnam War, or the Korean War;
WHEREAS, the U.S. military budget could be cut by 80% and remain the largest in the world;
WHEREAS, President Dwight David Eisenhower warned us 50 years ago that “In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist”;
WHEREAS, the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform proposed in both its Co-Chairs’ proposal in November 2010 and its final report in December 2010 major reductions in military spending;
WHEREAS, the U.S. Conference of Mayors, with the support of Charlottesville Mayor Dave Norris passed in June 2011 a resolution calling on Congress to redirect spending to domestic priorities;
WHEREAS, the people of the United States favor redirecting spending to domestic priorities;
WHEREAS, the people of the United States in numerous opinion polls favor withdrawing the U.S. military from Afghanistan;
WHEREAS, the United States has armed forces stationed at approximately 1,000 foreign bases in approximately 150 foreign countries;
WHEREAS, the United States is the wealthiest nation on earth but trails many other nations in life expectancy, infant mortality, education level, housing, and environmental sustainability, as well as in non-military aid to foreign nations;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the City Council of Charlottesville, Virginia, calls on the U.S. Congress to end foreign ground and drone wars and reduce base military spending, in order to meet vital human needs, promote job creation, re-train and re-employ those losing jobs in the process of conversion to non-military industries, rebuild our infrastructure, aid municipal and state governments, and develop a new economy based upon renewable, sustainable energy.

Cost to Charlottesville
no cost

Required Action from City Council
-Draft and approve resolution
-Circulate to Congressional Delegation and Staff

b. Cost of War Counter for City Hall and http://www.charlottesville.org

Background
-Citizens groups and city councilors have expressed an interest in making the costs of the United States’ engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan more visible to Charlottesville residents, particularly the cost to tax payers living ion Charlottesville.
-The National Priorities Project offers a war spending counter that is able to show the cost to all US taxpayers and for Charlottesville taxpayers specifically for both wars combined since 2001, or for Iraq since 2003, or for Afghanistan since 2001.
-A similar undertaking was made by the City of Binghamton, New York and was funded by private groups.
-The counter can be easily applied to the City website.

Materials
-View the cost of war counter at http://www.costofwar.com
As of January 1, 2011 the total cost of both wars to Charlottesville taxpayers is approximately $108 Million, for Iraq $67 Million, for Afghanistan $41 Million.
The total for both wars to the US is approximately $1.2 Trillion.
The counter can be applied to a website from http://www.costofwar.com

-Contact the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice
PO Box 2012
Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
Phone: (434) 961-6278
e-mail: charlottesvillepeace@gmail.com

-Contact the National Priorities Project:
243 King St. – Suite 109
Northampton, Massachusetts 01060
Phone: (413) 584-9556
Contact form at: http://nationalpriorities.org/en/about/contact/#contact-form

Cost to City of Charlottesville
$0 – $6000
-The counter installed at City Hall in Binghamton, NY cost around $6000. The city could cover the total cost, part of the cost, or could rely entirely on donated funds. The Public Art Fund could be one source of funding if Council decided to do so. The Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice is a non-profit 501c3 that could oversee fundraising for the project.

-No funds would be required for installing the counter at http://www.charlottesville.org

Required Action from City Council
-Decide to include total US war spending as well as Charlottesville war spending or both.
-Direct City Staff to include cost of war counter on city website.
-Indicate support for cost of war counter installation to Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice if private funding is desired.
-Decide on location, example: City Hall, City Space etc.
-Identify funding source, example: Public Art Fund, Private Donors etc.

c. Exclude Military Contractors, Military Agencies, and Paramilitary Organizations from Charlottesville Community Job Fair

Background
Since 2010 the City of Charlottesville has hosted the “Charlottesville Community Job Fair” attended by thousands of residents. The fair offers access to area, and out of area employers. Among the sponsors and employers participating in the fair are numerous businesses that contract directly with the military in number of functions. Some produce military hardware such as weaponry. Some produce research and development. Some produce intelligence. Some even create bio-weaponry. Along with these groups are included military agencies such as the US Army and the National Security Agency. These businesses and agencies thrive on taxpayer subsidies and funding.
-Military contractors are considered to be one of the biggest challenges to creating a world based on peace.
-Military agencies typically recruit from the low wealth people in our communities. Both military businesses and military agencies contribute to Charlottesville residents participating in the killing and dying associated with warfare.
-Both military and military related business have the ability to recruit employees through channels other than the Charlottesville Community Job Fair.

Materials
-City Job Fair website (includes links to various employers)
http://www.charlottesville.org/Index.aspx?page=951

-Past military contractors and military agencies who have sponsored and participated in the Charlottesville Community Job Fair:
Concurrent Technologies Corporation
Battelle
BAE Systems
Northrop Grunman
TEC Inc
TEKSystems
WISER
National Geo-Spatial Intelligence Agency
Virginia Army National Guard
OGSystems
Defense Logistics Agency Energy
Barron Associates
SAIC
National Security Agency
NIITEK
United States Army
SRC Inc.

Cost to City of Charlottesville
No funding is required.

Action Required from City Council
-Direct the Office of Economic Development to exclude military contractors, military agencies, and paramilitary organizations from the Charlottesville Community Job Fair as sponsors or employers (see list above), including but not limited to past employers participating.
-Direct the Office of Economic Development to require any employer and/or sponsor wishing to participate in the Charlottesville Community Jobs Fair, including US government agencies, to confirm that it does not contract with the military or is directly a military service or paramilitary organization.

d. Committee to Convert Military Industrial Complex
in Charlottesville to Civilian Use

Background
-Business based around military use reaps billions of taxpayer dollars in the United States and is considered one of the greatest challenges to creating a world based on peace.
-Charlottesville alone has at least 142 businesses that contract with the military.
-The United States, and the City of Charlottesville have built an economy based on warfare and all of the human suffering entailed therein.
-To begin the work of building an economy based on peace numerous challenges must be met. Profits made by the private sector using public funds, and the employment sustained by military contractors need to be addressed in order for a peace economy to be built and sustained. Charlottesville can be become a world leader and national model for the conversion movement.
-A 9 member committee supported and maintained by the City of Charlottesville and made up of 1 City Councilor, 1 representative from the Office of Economic Development, 1 representative from the Environmental Sustainability Division and 6 members of the Charlottesville Community would be created.
-The committee would be tasked with evaluating the presence of all businesses that contract with military, the potential for existing groups to eliminate military involvement, the re-purposing of facilities for a green economy, and make suggestions for conversion to the city and to business. In the second year the committee would actively work with business to address ways to convert to civilian use, and to further engage the City of Charlottesville. Interest has been expressed by Charlottesville residents to participate in such a committee.

Materials
-2011 Pollin and Garrett-Peltier Study from Political Economy Research Institute
Is attached and PDF can be found at http://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/published_study/PERI_military_spending_2011.pdf

-A list of local military contractors can be found at: http://www.governmentcontractswon.com/department/defense/charlottesville_va_virginia.asp

Cost to City of Charlottesville
No extra funds would be required for this committee to be established. Staff would include their participation in their on-going duties. Any material funds for the committee would be paid from the operating budget for the Office of Economic Development.

Action Required from City Council
-Create “Committee for Conversion of Military Contractors to Peacetime Economy” made up of 1 City Councilor, 1 representative from the Office of Economic Development, 1 representative from the Environmental Sustainability Division and 6 members of the Charlottesville Community.
-Issue call for applicants, appoint committee members
-Craft mission statement, to include: evaluation of existing military contractors, income from military contracts, the amount of employees related to military contracting, and nature if contracting work. Explore potential for eliminating military contracts and the effects on existing business. Explore potential for replacing military contracts with other business, explore possible re-purposing of facilities for civilian purposes. Explore potential for “green” economic activity.
-Report to Council with findings and suggestions, engage community and business to address and implement suggestions for conversion.

e. Support for Advocate Committee to explore new
Sister City Relationship(s)

Background
-Charlottesville is engaged in four sister city relationships. These relationships have been created by groups of residents coming together to do the hard work of forming connections, an advocate committee, and maintaining the relationship with foreign cities.
-In an effort to continue to form bonds globally and decrease the likelihood of future wars or bring an end to current wars Charlottesville could explore new sister city relationships with countries currently under US military combat operations, or a city that may be the target of future military action, particularly in the Middle East.
-Due to the sensitive political nature of the areas to focus on, residents may be hesitant to form an advocate committee without some expression from council that they desire a new relationship.
-The council or other governmental body may also initiate a sister city relationship and council could consider this as well.
-In Charlottesville, residents and peace activists have formed bonds with communities in the middle east. Charlottesville recently hosted a back an d forth delegation to and from Kabul, Afghanistan. Charlottesville has a growing Afghan population, and peace activists have also formed relationships through Afghan Peace Volunteers. A combination of an already established relationship inside Afghanistan might be a great start to forming an advocate committee.
-Charlottesville residents also have established ties in Palestine and Iran.

Material
Information on the Sister City Program can be found on the Charlottesville website at http://www.charlottesville.org/Index.aspx?page=1735

Guidelines for Affiliating (attached)
Strategic Plan (attached)

Sister Cities International website http://www.sister-cities.org/
Cost to City of Charlottesville
-Citizen fundraising is vital to the sister city program, and would be for any new project.
Any city funds required would be from the existing operating structure of the Sister Cities Commission.
-A government sponsored advocate group would require extra funds from the city.

Action Required from City Council
-Indicate political support and/or preference for new sister city to area residents interested.
-Alternative- establish governmental agency to form advocate committee for sister city relationship.

f. Call for Arrest of War Criminals who Enter Charlottesville City Limits

Background
-Charlottesville has been visited by former officials who have been considered “war criminals” by various international courts and bodies.
-When these visits have been scheduled it is generally too late to build a case or instruct local law enforcement agencies to arrest the perpetrators.
-Councilors Dave Norris and Kristin Szakos were present and spoke to a rally in Charlottesville calling for the arrest of John Yoo in 2009. This suggests a willingness by sitting members of council to address the situation.
-Switzerland, Italy, Zambia, and localities in Canada have expressed interest in prosecuting for war crimes and would be a starting place for seeking to extradite as they are a part of the 147 signatories, including the United States, to the “1987 United Nations Convention on Torture”.
-Inside the United States a handful of localities have called for the arrest of certain former officials for their involvement in crimes committed against US citizens and foreign nationals including Brattleboro, Vermont and Marlboro, Vermont.
-In the interest of assuring justice and reducing the future acts of current officials to engage in illegal aggressive war, torture, and human rights violations the city could call for the arrest of wanted criminals, make those arrests and extradite the suspects or try them under local and state laws.

Material
An extensive list of war crimes participants and their crimes can be found at http://www.warcriminalswatch.org/index.php/the-culpable/36-the-culprits
The list includes:
George W. Bush- aggressive war (crimes against peace), torture, violations of human rights treaties
Richard Cheney- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties
Donald Rumsfeld- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties
Alberto Gonzales- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties
Condoleeza Rice- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties
Jay Bybee- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties
John Yoo- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties

Also to be considered:
Henry Kissinger- aggressive war, torture, violations of human rights treaties, genocide
Information available at http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Kissinger/CaseAgainst1_Hitchens.html

Ample material and hard copies of the above information can be obtained by request.

1987 Convention on Torture can be found at http://untreaty.un.org/cod/avl/ha/catcidtp/catcidtp.html
hard copy available upon request

Cost to City of Charlottesville
Funding would be included in existing budgets for participating agencies.

Action Required from Council
-Instruct Commonwealth Attorney, Sheriff Department and Charlottesville Police Department to investigate possible violations of local, state, national laws and international treaties.
-Instruct above agencies to consult with participants in the “1987 Convention on Torture” concerning possible extradition requests for those wanted.
-Draft and Issue a Statement to the following war crimes suspects that arrest and trial or extradition may occur if they enter city limits:
Elliot Abrams, David Addington, John Ashcroft, John Bellinger III, John R. Bolton, Paul Bremer, George W. Bush, Jay S. Bybee, Andrew H. Card, Richard Cheney, Michael Chertoff, Douglas Feith, Tommy Ray Franks, Jonathan M. Fredman, Robert gates, Alberto Gonzales, Stephen J. Hadley, Michael V. Hayden, William J. Haynes, Henry Kissinger, Lewis I. Libby, Stanley McChrystal, John Negroponte, Nancy Pelosi, Richard N. Perle, David Patraeus, Colin L. Powell, Erik Prince, Condoleeza Rice, John Rizzo, Karl C. Rove, Donald H. Rumsfeld, George J. Tenet, Paul Wolfowitz, John C. Yoo.
-Instruct Commonwealth Attorney to prepare for trial of war criminals under local jurisdiction.

g. Declare September 21st International Day of Peace,
host IDoP Celebration

Background
-The United Nations declared an International Day of Peace in 1981. In 2001 it declared that the Day of Peace be held every September 21st.
-For many years now the Interfaith Cooperation Circle has sponsored an International Day of Peace celebration in Charlottesville.
-In 2011 The Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice and the Interfaith Cooperation Circle hosted a series of events to celebrate IDoP, and built numerous community ties and found many participants for the celebrations. The coalition was asked to “envision peace”.
-Included in this coalition was the City of Charlottesville and the Charlottesville City School Board.
-On Sept. 19, 2011 Charlottesville City Council proclaimed September 21st, 2011 an International Day of Peace.
-Continued support for the IDoP celebrations has been expressed by councilors, school board members, the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice, and the Interfaith Cooperation Circle.
-Some residents have expressed interest in a IDoP parade in Charlottesville.

Material
United Nations General Assembly Resolution Sept. 7, 2001 (attached)

International Day of Peace website http://internationaldayofpeace.org/

Charlottesville International Day of Peace Proclamation Sept. 19, 2011:
Whereas, the International Day of Peace has been recognized and celebrated by millions of people worldwide since it was started by a United Nations resolution almost thirty years ago, and
Whereas, many civic organizations and religious congregations in our community have formed a coalition to both celebrate the International Day of Peace and to challenge our community to envision peace and non-violence in our society, and
Whereas, the benefits of peace and non-violence in our community include greater personal and communal well-being, greater public safety, and greater effectiveness in the resolution of disagreements,
We do hereby resolve that on the 21st day of September our community joins in the celebration of the International Day of Peace and that members of our community commemorate and strengthen the ideals of peace and non-violence.

Contact for Interfaith Cooperation Circle/CCPJ IDoP Committee:
Robert McAdams
rsm1539@earthlink.net

Cost to City of Charlottesville
No cost beyond normal operating expense to participate in the celebrations.
If council chose to waive fees for use of public space there would be minimal cost to the city associated with having custodial crew present for events or other city staff.
The cost of a parade would be entirely up to the city to decide, the main item being extra police officers present.

Action required from Council
-Draft and Issue an International Day of Peace Proclamation beginning with language included- “From this day forward September 21st will be…”
-Waive fees associated with use of public space for the International Day of Peace celebrations.
-Appoint proper city representative to International Day of Peace Planning Committee if so requested.
-Grant permit for parade on Sept. 21, 2012, waive associated fees for parade.

United Nations General Assembly Resolution Sept. 7, 2001:
“Recalling its resolution 36/67 of 30 November 1981, by which it declared that the third Tuesday of September, the opening day of the regular sessions of the General Assembly, shall be officially proclaimed and observed as International Day of Peace and shall be devoted to commemorating and strengthening the ideals of peace both within and among all nations and peoples, 
Recalling also its other relevant resolutions, including resolution 55/14 of 3 November 2000, 
Reaffirming the contribution that the observance and celebration of the International Day of Peace makes in strengthening the ideals of peace and alleviating tensions and causes of conflict, 
Considering the unique opportunity it offers for a cessation of violence and conflict throughout the world, and the related importance of achieving the broadest possible awareness and observance of the International Day of Peace among the global community, 
Desiring to draw attention to the objectives of the International Day of Peace, and therefore to fix a date for its observance each year that is separate from the opening day of the regular sessions of the General Assembly, 
1. Decides that, with effect from the fifty-seventh session of the General Assembly, the International Day of Peace shall be observed on 21 September each year, with this date to be brought to the attention of all people for the celebration and observance of peace; 
2. Declares that the International Day of Peace shall henceforth be observed as a day of global ceasefire and non-violence, an invitation to all nations and people to honour a cessation of hostilities for the duration of the Day; 
3. Invites all Member States, organizations of the United Nations system, regional and non-governmental organizations and individuals to commemorate, in an appropriate manner, the International Day of Peace, including through education and public awareness, and to cooperate with the United Nations in the establishment of the global ceasefire.”

h. End Reliance on Oil Resources in City Planning

Background
Oil and energy resources are driving our nation into a state of constant war and military expansion. Corporate oil and energy interests gain much from US military military support of strategic access to markets and reserves. These same oil interests gain much from American taxpayers in the forms of subsidies, sales, and taxpayer support of a bloated military budget. Charlottesville has committed to becoming a more sustainable city, this should not just be considered for the impacts on ecology but also for the impacts to global stability and peace.

Cost to City of Charlottesville
The costs to the city are difficult to determine but would fall under existing budgets.
The benefits to the city include increased savings on operations.

Action Required for Council
– Adopt and Adhere to Planetary Bill of Rights (4.a.)
– Declare Moratorium on Road Building
– Continue to Upgrade City Fleet
– Expansion of Public Transit (see 3.)
– Direct Planning Commission to Seek Ways to Limit Sprawl
– Include in Clear Goals for Reducing Oil Consumption and Sprawl in the Comprehensive Plan

 i. Support Community Efforts to Reduce Presence of
Military in City Schools

Background
Charlottesville City Schools have consistently allowed military recruiters into the school system, particularly during lunch periods in the school cafeterias. Numerous localities nationwide allow private groups to present an alternative to military service. A group of community members have expressed a willingness to begin “Alternatives to Military Service” program in the schools. As a result of the No Child Left behind Act, military recruitment is ensured in our schools, as is the sharing of student information with recruiters. Students and parents have the ability to opt out of information sharing, but the option is not well known. The School Board has the ability to issue periodic opt out forms to students and parents. Testing of students for military recruitment is present in many schools throughout the country, the school board has the ability to refrain from allowing the use of “Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery“ (ASVB). As a “City of Peace” the School Board has the duty to allow community members into the classrooms and into assemblies for information of peace building, peace history, and non-violence.

Material
Counter recruitment and Alternatives to Military Service materials will be submitted to Charlottesville City School Board.
Information from National Network Opposing the Militarization of Youth: http://www.nnomy.org/
Information from War Resisters League: http://www.warresisters.org/counterrecruitment
Information from Rutgers School of Law found at: http://www.law.newark.rutgers.edu/files/Military%20Recruitment%20Report.pdf

Information on ASVAB http://www.studentprivacy.org/

Contact for “Alternatives to Military Service” in Charlottesville
Brandon Collins
536 Meade Ave
Charlottesville, Va 22902
(434) 249-3312
brandoncollins@comcast.net

Cost to City of Charlottesville
No Cost
Alternative- City contribution to alternatives to military service could be covered by City Schools budget or direct contribution from City of Charlottesville if desired by those bodies. This contribution would be small, less than $1000 for materials.

Action Required from Council
Express support for the following community efforts to Charlottesville City School Board:
– Allow “Alternatives to Military Service” table at Charlottesville High School during lunch periods.
– Opt Out of Information Sharing Notice Issued to Parents Twice Per School Year
– Seek Out Educational Presentations on Peace, Non-Violence, and Accuracy in Military Recruitment
– Ban Using “Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery” in City Schools
– Alternative- Require Parental Permission for ASVAB

 e-mail: brandoncollins@comcast.net to learn more!

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